How to use the Tactical Chronograph

Assuming you use an electronic calendar for your meetings and other reminders, DON’T duplicate effort. Devices are searchable, but physical agendas are better for planning your month, week, and day.

  1. Set an alert with your phone on Sunday night to plan your week.
  2. Your big weekly To-Do list is a catch-all for fresh ideas, or migrated tasks that you haven’t scheduled for a specific day.
  3. Set an alert for every morning or evening, and use it for journaling, reflecting, and preparing for the coming day.
  4. Weekdays in red type are statutory holidays in Canada or the USA. As more people subscribe from international locations, I may add more national holidays, but I don’t list or describe them. You’ll know yours.
  5. Weekends are as important as weekdays: plan and record your home and social projects and personal time. It’s important to see how you use it and with whom!
  6. “Today is: ” is where you write deadlines, birthdays, anniversaries, events and, if there’s room, intentions.
  7. “Pencil it in!” Use pencil for rough plans. Add appointment times after ‘:’ in the time slots (9:45, 2:30, 5:15, 6:10… ). Use ink for everything that won’t or can’t be changed (such as items in the past!).
  8. Keep a micro-journal with the daily entries and take notes.
    1. Use the Chronicle to remember the details of your day. Mention new people you meet, events of the day, feelings, and specifics. Write in at least one thing every day!
    2. The Notes section on every page is appropriate for to-dos or anything you want. The little graphics are meant to delight you, and serve as a memory key for where you recorded anything important.
  9. Use Habits for building habits during the week – don’t forget to record them! At the end of the month, review and calculate your efficacy in keeping them.
  10. Use the Monthly credit/accountability grid on the back cover to keep track of sporadic and scheduled events. Examples: a sporadic or daily activity at work; posting Stories and pictures to Instagram…
  11. If you have weeks where you don’t get your to-dos done, migrate them to the next week(s). Put them on the page spread where you’re most likely to get them done (week planning and Monday; Tuesday to Thursday, Friday and the weekend).
  12. At month’s end, review and carry information back to your Life’s Battle Plan workbook, or forward to another Chronograph.
  13. Record every instance of magic that you create or happens to you!

What is magic? And what about the daily “Gratitude, joy?”

It’s important to reflect on every day and find one moment worth recording, even if mundane, that made you feel thankful. Here are a few suggestions:

  • Surprise gifts – and things you find (“gifts from nature” or “the universe” are often the best kind!)
  • Accomplished goals and tasks
  • The beauty of nature
  • Fellowship with others (both human and non-human!)
  • LOL moments – even a good meme 😉
  • Memories worth refreshing
  • Blessings and miracles – things you need that arrive in unpredictable, unexpected ways.

Different monthly prompts

The layout of the Tactical Chronograph updates every month because of shifts in the dates of the days of the week, but sometimes for something more…interesting. Whenever space allows, I’ll put in questions to prompt you to reflect and set an intention appropriate for the month or season.

Creative Commons Licence

2018 versions:

Life’s Battle Plan: Tactical Chronograph by Jane Sorensen is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License.
Based on work at https://projectica.org/chronograph.
The scope of this license: You may adapt this work (bullet journalling, or copy-paste certain sections of it into a document or a book) for your personal use. If you show it to someone else and they want to try it, too, share this page so others can download their own.

Comment below, or reach me here.  Better yet, email me direct at the address on the back cover of the Tactical Chronograph!

PetTinder – “Play a game, share the love, save a life.”

PetTinder! The game where you meet your “match” – at least with pets.

PetTinder is a name mashup: PetFinder is a website that helps people adopt a pet. Tinder (in case you didn’t know!) is a dating app that lets people match up for dates with a swift and easy finger-swipe.

It isn’t meant for your pets to date or for you to find a date to bring your pet to. It’s just a fun way to meet real pets from animal shelters near you – like that puppy with big paws that you never forgot. Only now, you get to know more about them, and celebrate when they get adopted.

And it’s not about getting you to adopt them. You couldn’t adopt them all even if you wanted to! Just play the game, love with a 💜, and share them when you want. Collect game play badges for rewards and achievements, and follow the  leaderboard to compare your play with others.

But the real ninja skill of the game is that every time you 💜 a pet, you make a micro-donation to the shelter where it’s at – and save it to your list so you can follow them. Because two of the problems of running an animal shelter are

1) getting the right people to see the right pets at the right time to adopt, and

2) finding the money to keep everyone secure, fed, and healthy until then.

PetTinder is a social game that helps the animals in a unique way – and you get to support them while you’re waiting in line at the grocery store. Props if that hot guy or girl behind you can see you play. Nothing says “great date!” quite like loving cute animals!

Help make this game fun!

We’re looking for interested animal shelter friends and game players to build a player community to try the app, develop it, and find ways to get it out to gamers (Millennials, their kids, their parents, and anyone else).  Want to know how to play? Read this article. 

Want to help? Sign up!

Help make this game reality!

We need marketers, graphic artists, and developers who can offer some time for this open source project on Github. We originally planned to code with React Native, but a Unity development environment presents other possibilities.  We also need back-end databases and reports. For now, it’s a labour of love that pays in beer and pizza and good feelings. The goal is to keep a low overhead to send the shelters the greatest donations possible. We need a good prototype and initial user base to persuade the first charitable beneficiary to partner with us to fund these shelters.

But we also expect it to become popular, so when it gets a lot of traction, it will have some overhead to employ the people who make it work.

Are you one of these people? Sign up!

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