Your monthly pocket agenda, downloaded.

Here’s the agenda that captures everything you need, but only what you need in the timeframe you’re looking at. Now.

That is, the month at hand. This week.  Or the next three days. You prefer scribbling everything by hand, on the fly, and looking at it with a bird’s-eye view when you’re putting your days and weeks together.  You find notes help you keep track of your days.

“But I already put things into my phone,” you say.

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The meaning of the background wallpaper

The dotted circles are a metaphor for an ideal society, with porous and intersecting perimeters of groups of people.

Regardless of the reasons that make groups seem open or impenetrable at any given moment, groups are made of people who each want to live a full life. That’s why they join and create groups with others! So, despite overt and implied rules by which people are included or excluded from different groups, intersecting circles is a valid representation of society. You are never isolated. There are many groups to which you can belong.

Welcoming and serendipitous opportunities – the things that keep boundaries porous – help keep society open, functional, and optimistic.

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How to use the Tactical Chronograph

Assuming you use an electronic calendar for your meetings and other reminders, DON’T duplicate effort. Devices are searchable, but physical agendas are better for planning your month, week, and day.

  1. Set an alert with your phone on Sunday night to plan your week.
  2. Your big weekly To-Do list is a catch-all for fresh ideas, or migrated tasks that you haven’t scheduled for a specific day.
  3. Set an alert for every morning or evening, and use it for journaling, reflecting, and preparing for the coming day.
  4. Weekdays in red type are statutory holidays in Canada or the USA. As more people subscribe from international locations, I may add more national holidays, but I don’t list or describe them. You’ll know yours.
  5. Weekends are as important as weekdays: plan and record your home and social projects and personal time. It’s important to see how you use it and with whom!
  6. “Today is: ” is where you write deadlines, birthdays, anniversaries, events and, if there’s room, intentions.
  7. “Pencil it in!” Use pencil for rough plans. Add appointment times after ‘:’ in the time slots (9:45, 2:30, 5:15, 6:10… ). Use ink for everything that won’t or can’t be changed (such as items in the past!).
  8. Keep a micro-journal with the daily entries and take notes.
    1. Use the Chronicle to remember the details of your day. Mention new people you meet, events of the day, feelings, and specifics. Write in at least one thing every day!
    2. The Notes section on every page is appropriate for to-dos or anything you want. The little graphics are meant to delight you, and serve as a memory key for where you recorded anything important.
  9. Use Habits for building habits during the week – don’t forget to record them! At the end of the month, review and calculate your efficacy in keeping them.
  10. Use the Monthly credit/accountability grid on the back cover to keep track of sporadic and scheduled events. Examples: a sporadic or daily activity at work; posting Stories and pictures to Instagram…
  11. If you have weeks where you don’t get your to-dos done, migrate them to the next week(s). Put them on the page spread where you’re most likely to get them done (week planning and Monday; Tuesday to Thursday, Friday and the weekend).
  12. At month’s end, review and carry information back to your Life’s Battle Plan workbook, or forward to another Chronograph.
  13. Record every instance of magic that you create or happens to you!
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